Dr. Michael Glock

Practical philosophy, rooted in the depth psychology of Freud, Jung, and Hillman, offers a path toward fundamental wellness by encouraging the exploration of the subconscious and the personal myths that shape our existence. This approach aligns with Jung’s concept of individuation, the process of discovering and integrating various aspects of the self, and recognizes the importance of each individual’s unique life story or myth in their psychological development (Jung, 1959).

Teaching Philosophy

Teaching philosophy, especially for Dr. Michael Glock, Ph.D., is not just a profession but a passion deeply rooted in the exploration of the subconscious and personal myths. His unique approach is influenced by his research into experimental hypnotherapy, Tantra, and Indigenous wisdom, adding a distinct flavor to his teachings. This blend of interests, combined with his extensive work on Jungian psychology, futuristics, and depth psychology, forms the foundational ingredients of the 3-Step Breakthrough Method he developed as a co-founder of Joymind.

Practical philosophy, as championed by Glock is rooted in the depth psychology of Freud, Jung, and Hillman, offers a path toward fundamental wellness by encouraging the exploration of the subconscious and the personal myths that shape our existence. This approach aligns with Jung’s concept of individuation, the process of discovering and integrating various aspects of the self, and recognizes the importance of each individual’s unique life story or myth in their psychological development (Jung, 1959).

The teaching of philosophy, in this context, becomes a journey towards self-understanding, where clients are guided to think causally and reflectively about not only texts but also their own lives. By examining the underlying reasons for why things are the way they are, from a psychological and philosophical perspective, individuals gain insights into their own behaviors, motivations, and values.

Freud’s psychoanalytic theory, particularly his work on dreams, provides a framework for understanding the workings of the unconscious mind. Through careful analysis and interpretation, individuals can uncover the hidden aspects of their psyche and address the repressed issues that impact their well-being (Freud, 1913).

In the sessions, this translates to a method of teaching that fosters deep, analytical thinking, asking clients to look beyond the surface to understand the intricate web of causes behind a phenomenon, much like the psychoanalytic process of uncovering the latent content behind manifest dream images. This method echoes James Hillman’s “Revisioning Psychology,” which suggests that by reimagining psychology, we can better address the soul’s needs and aspirations (Hillman, 1975).

Moreover, Abraham Maslow’s hierarchy of needs provides a structure for understanding the human motivation towards self-realization. This hierarchy culminates in self-actualization, a state in which individuals may fulfill their highest potential, paralleling the process of individuation in Jungian psychology (Maslow, 1943).

Paramahansa Yogananda’s concept of Self-realization furthers this idea, offering a spiritual perspective that self-awareness is the ultimate goal of life, achieved through a process of inner discovery and meditation, aligning with the deeper aspects of practical philosophy (Yogananda, 1946).

The teaching philosophy that embraces these principles and also includes the new field of Positive Psychology encourages clients to explore and understand their inner worlds, fostering a holistic sense of wellness. It advocates for the discovery of one’s myth and supports the path of individuation as crucial for psychological health. As individuals engage with their inner narratives, they can better navigate life’s challenges, leading to a more fulfilling and authentic existence.

References:

  • Freud, S. (1913). The interpretation of dreams. S.E., 4-5.
  • Hillman, J. (1975). Revisioning psychology. Harper & Row.
  • Jung, C. G. (1959). The archetypes and the collective unconscious. R.F.C. Hull (Trans.), Collected Works of C.G. Jung, Vol. 9, Part 1. Princeton University Press.
  • Maslow, A. H. (1943). A theory of human motivation. Psychological Review, 50(4), 370–396.
  • Yogananda, P. (1946). The autobiography of a yogi. Self-Realization Fellowship.

Incorporating these principles into a teaching philosophy not only helps clients to understand literature and art but also serves as a guide in their personal journey towards self-realization and wellness. Through this imaginative and educational approach, the revolutionary power of collective intelligence is harnessed, allowing for personal and professional success to unfold as new beginnings are navigated each month.